Time Management Tips

You may walk into the door of your office feeling overwhelmed within the first moment.

Time flies, manage your time wisely.

Know that there is help! By consciously focusing on a few tips you may BE and FEEL more organized and efficient.

Following are Time Management Tips you may find beneficial:

1. Utilize Technical Tools, such as Google Calendar, to synchronize your work, personal, and financial stewardship calendar. Download to your cell phone and share events on your website.

2. Unclutter Your Work Space. Get really “down-’n'-dirty” on a monthly basis, throwing away papers, deleting unnecessary emails, filing or scanning papers worth keeping. Consider going “paperless.”

3. Plan your day the evening before to hit the office running, prioritizing tasks in the morning and re-evaluating mid-day. Organize your work week and schedule yourself “catch up time” a couple times a week.

4. Include Relationship Building on your “to-do list.” Networking with colleagues and keeping in touch with friends is good for  your work and personal life. Never underestimate the power of networking–extremely valuable!

5. Schedule Breaks and Vacations for a mental, emotional, and healthy “time-out.” Reserve this time to be unplugged from your phone and interruptions. Allow yourself to relax, rejuvenate, and regroup with the things that are near and dear to you.

What additional tips can you offer? Please post your comments and let us know how you plan your day, utilize technology, or where you recently took a vacation.

Cheers, RR

So much to do. So little time!

Is that how you feel, everyday, all the time? So much to do, so little time!

Me, too, especially lately. We have two options: (1) keep plugging along at the same pace (doing what we have always done–signs of insanity), or (2) we make a conscious decision to become more organized, efficient, and timely.

I learned the other day we all have the same 10,800 minutes in a week. Well, if I look at it that way, I can certainly manage those minutes better!

In recent research, I have seen a pattern in self-management articles. Following is a recap.

1. Is your current organizational space working for you? Recall a time you were under the gun, in a time crunch; were you able to find what you needed (files, materials, papers), focus on the task, research and complete the job? If yes, then your current organizational space may suit your personal needs. If no, then you may consider identifying a new strategy. Organization is a personal preference. I can remember working with a wonderfully kind, great veterinarian. I have no idea how he found anything in his work space, but he managed, somehow! Continue reading

Leading by Example: Attentive Listening

Every day you have an opportunity to lead by example. Think about these specific areas:

  • diverting gossip
  • taking the higher road
  • positively commenting on a job well done
  • offering a sincere “thank you”

These are simple things, and yet so powerful when you lead by example.

You may be a team leader, a go-getter, a person with a vision, or even hold the title of manager or doctor. How do you lead by example?

Lean in, focus and listen, intently, consciously and with the desire to improve

If you act as a leader, if you automatically choose to look at the bright side of things, see the glass as half full, and do all this with sincerity– without really even thinking of it–then you may be on the path to being a great leader. Can you see solutions and allow (or even better yet, encourage) others to come up with solutions, too? Anyone can talk about problems, day in and day out. A leader helps to identify and bring to fruition solutions!

A leader “talks the talk and walks the walk.” What does that mean to you? Continue reading

Introverts and Ideas

You may enjoy viewing this video. I DID!

http://emmasparkologist.co.uk/2012/04/04/introverts-and-ideas/

I recommend you view this and think of the fact that the veterinary community is largely Introverts (60-70%, myevt.com). Absolutely enlightening. Allow for more solitude and inner-reflection when asking your veterinary team for their input.

Thanks, RR

 

 

Professionalism and Your Team

You may find it difficult to get your team on the same page when it comes to presenting a professional, consistent image at your veterinary hospital. You are not alone in this endeavor! Managers ask me about motivating their team, knowing how to engage them and what makes them work together as a team. A lot of times my answer is simply, “Have you asked them?”

Building a culture which allows for open dialog, problem solving and engagement seems to elude a number of managers. Please read a recent article created for My Exceptional Veterinary Team: How to Discuss Professionalism with Your Team.http://www.myevt.com/columns/how-discuss-professionalism-your-team

I strongly suggest, with the ENTIRE team, the week before you set down to create and initiate a professionalism policy or guidelines, you lead with the following exercise, which you can download from GoalInstitute, a Professionalism Quick Test: http://www.goalsinstitute.com/professionalism-quick-test.php

Make this exercise fun, lively and light. Put up a flip chart, grab colorful markers, ask your team characteristics or traits of a professional. Then have them fill out the Quick Test. Lead by example and explain your score (I came in as TOLERABLE, offering a large opportunity for improvement) and how you plan on improving your score over the next couple of weeks. Ask if someone else is willing to share their thoughts and ideas for improvement.

You will also find a Team Development Worksheet with MyEVT’s article. Use it for various other topics, both low and high risk topics. Start out with rather simple exercises (dress code, parking etiquette, etc) and move onto more challenging topics (smoking policies, socila media guidelines, etc).

The point is, LISTEN to your team, ask them what they want guiding their daily directions and offering help in the creation and discipline of issues that directly effect them. One common trait found amongst GREAT LEADERS, they were GREAT LISTENERS!

Cheers, here’s to your team creating their own guidelines for professionalism! RR