Salary Statistics for Various Titles in Veterinary Medicine

You may wonder what other individuals are making in veterinary medicine. I recently wrote proceeding notes for the CACVT Spring Conference and it was powerful brining together various survey results in one place. Tell we what you think.

Following are statistics for salaries of veterinary technicians, assistants and managers from various sites:

  • National Association of Veterinary Technicians (NAVTA),
  • Colorado Association of Certified Veterinary Technicians (CACVT),
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS),
  • Veterinary Hospital Managers Association (VHMA) and
  • American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) for various positions and titles. You may appreciate having these statistics all in one place.

Average Salary-NAVTA Surveys                  

NAVTA is in the process of collating 2011 survey!

Average Salary     2007      $36,120

Food animal practice  $39,800

Companion animal       $33,270

Equine practice             $32,840

Mixed animal                 $28,960

Emergency practice     $38,860

Specialty practice         $39,810

Industry/Sales              $51,510

Education                     $42,980

University/College     $37,350

Government                $42,200

Not-for-profit               $34,180

Diagnostic/Research  $45,060

As you can see, salaries vary greatly among fellow technicians. Those in Research, Development and Education may have more than a two year Associates in Applied Sciences (AAS) degree. Technicians attending one of the nine 4-year programs may be positioning themselves to work in academia. Industry and Sales careers require varied degrees of experience, however once you get your foot in the door, corporate companies often pay for continued education and classes.

 

CACVT Surveys                Complete surveys can be found on CACVT website

Topic

2005

2007

2009

2011

Demographics 29%  age 25-30 27%   age 25-30 22%  age 25-30 24.1%   age 25-30
16%   age 31-35 20%   31-35 21%   age 31-35 20.3%   age 31-35
Occupations-Mgr 1%   Mgr 1%   Mgr 3.5%   Mgr 3.8%   mgr
2%   head tech 5%   head tech
6%   tech/mgr combo 4%   tech/mgr combo 6.5   tech/mgr combo 1.3   tech/mgr
9%   in management 10%   in management 10%   in management 5.1%   in management
Current   Wage 30%   $12.01-14.00 25%   $12.01-14.00 23%   $12.01-14.00 24% $14.01-16.00
19%   $10.01-12.00 18%   $14.01-16.00 23%   $14.01-16.00 19.9% $12.01-14.00
Wage   comparison 10%   $16.01-18.00 16%   $16.01-18.00 12%   $16.01-18.00 11.6%   $16.01-18.00
 $24 or more 9.6%
Years   in the field 21%  yrs 1-3 19%   yrs 1-3 15%   yrs 5.1-7 18.1%   1-3 yrs
17%   yrs 3.1-5 19%   7-10 15%   yrs 3.1-7  14.8% 7.1-10 years
38%   yrs 1-5 38%   yrs 1-10 30%   yrs 3-7 14.2%    more than 20 yrs

BLS                                                                 http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes292056.htm

I CHALLENGE YOU TO GO TO THIS SITE AND LOOK AT ALL THE MAPS, GRAPHS AND STATISTICS!

Veterinary technologists and technicians held about 79,870 jobs in 2010 (www.bls.gov). Approximately 91 percent worked in veterinary practices under the direct supervision of veterinarians. As the number of veterinarians grows to meet the demand for veterinary care, so will the number of veterinary technicians needed to assist them.

Employment (1)

Employment
RSE
(3)

Mean hourly
wage

Mean annual
wage
(2)

Wage RSE (3)

79,870

2.2 %

$14.92

$31,030

0.6 %

BLS 2010 http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes292056.htm

Employment of veterinary technologists and technicians is still expected to grow 36 percent over the 2008-18 projection period, which is much faster than the average for many occupations. Excellent job opportunities are expected because of the relatively few veterinary technology graduates each year. The number of 2-year programs has recently grown from 160 to 190, but due to small class sizes, fewer than 3,800 graduates are anticipated each year, a number that is not expected to meet demand. Additionally, many veterinary technicians remain in the field less than 10 years, so the need to replace workers who leave the occupation each year also will produce many job opportunities. Employment of veterinary technicians and technologists is relatively stable during periods of economic recession. Layoffs are less likely to occur among veterinary technicians than in some other occupations because animals will continue to require medical care and the Human Animal Bond continues to grow.
States with highest concentration of veterinary technicians:

State

Employment (1)

Employment per thousand jobs

Location quotient (9)

Hourly mean wage

Annual mean wage (2)

Vermont

410

1.43

2.27

$14.78

$30,740

Colorado

2,590

1.20

1.91

$14.14

$29,420

New Hampshire

660

1.10

1.74

$15.30

$31,830

Rhode Island

480

1.07

1.71

$14.50

$30,160

Massachusetts

3,180

1.02

1.63

$16.92

$35,190

The American Animal Hospital Association’s “Compensation and Benefits Review,” 2009   Complete article can be found in Trends Magazine

Credentialed technician…$32,635/yr            +/_ $16.00/hr

Noncredentialed tech……$27,5018 /yr         +/_ $13.50/hr

Office Manager……………$35,259 / yr            +/_ $17.50/hr

Practice Manager …………$45,765/yr            +/_ $22.50/hr

Practice Administrator….$48,565/yr             +/_ $24.00/hr

VHMA Compensation and  Benefits Report 2009

If a VHMA member, complete report on their site.

Receptionist          $12.00/hr

Office Mgr             $15.85/hr

Practice Mgr         $21.64/hr

Hospital Admin     $29.86/hr

Credentialed VT   $16.00/hr

Non CVT                 $13.50/hr

VTS                          $19.30/hr

Tech Assist            $10.35/hr

Alright, enough already, stop with the numbers! You may see different trends and take something home from this. Those are the statistics; you do with them what you will. How are you being compensated, compared to your state or nationally?  Keep in mind, NAVTA members typically make more money than non-members (is that because their practice is paying their dues, leading me to believe they are in a well-managed practice?) AAHA practices, I would hope, are well-managed. Hospitals with managers and various titles and duties, are well-managed, I would ASSUME. Consider the level of management you have in your veterinary practice. How does management effect your personal professional growth? What do you want to be compensated? How will you reach that goal? Begin with a self-assessment!

What did you find most interesting?

Cheers, RR

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